Some information about L’Île-Bizard, a green island…

Here is some information about L’Île-Bizard’s green spaces that reminds us how important it is to protect them…

L’Île-Bizard is a green island! Fortunately, despite the housing developments of these past 50 years which quadrupled the island’s population, L’Île-Bizard is an ecological gem unique in Montreal which fosters an extremely rich biodiversity. We want it to stay that way, for the good of today’s population and future generations!

Some numbers…

The island covers a surface area of 2277 hectares (22.7 km), 1087 of which (48%) are farm lands located in the Western part of the island. L’Île-Bizard has three great golf clubs, totalling 617 hectares (27 % of the island), 457 of which are zoned agricultural. They are also located on the Western side, on the Elm Ridge and Royal Montreal golf clubs covered by the humanized landscape project (Paysage humanisé – see next post). The nature park spreads over 255 hectares, occupying 11 % of the island.

Ecological characteristics of the island…

L’Île-Bizard’s territory is characterized by a network of important wet lands (marshes and swamps) connected through waterways and mature forests. These green spaces are home to many rare plants and constitute a habitat of major interest for amphibians and reptiles, as well as the waterfowl and forest birds. Many vulnerable or threatened species can be found on the island, like the black maple, the map turtle, the brown and the king snakes, the red shouldered and Cooper’s hawks and the waterfowl bird. Also in the Western part of the island we find the greatest concentration of riparian wetlands in the Montreal agglomeration. These are home to birds of prey, whitetail deers and birds like the bobolink, the Eastern meadowlark and the blue rock thrush, which are becoming scarcer in the Montreal region because of a loss of habitat.

A dozen plant species there are considered potentially threatened or vulnerable, like the swamp white oak, the oval hickory, the Columbia watermeal, Goldie’s woodfern and the Bur-reed Sedge. The northern part of the nature park is made up of large wild lands that are feeding areas for birds of prey, with neighboring cedar groves used by the whitetail deers in the winter. The southern part of the park is dominated by sugar maple ecosystems that are over a hundred years old and where we can find five rare plant species. These maples are protecting the wetlands of the nature park. These forests can be used by two rare birds of prey considered to be precarious: the red shouldered and Cooper’s hawks. The black maple grove in the north-western part of the park is extremely rare in Montreal, and not very common in the province. It has been designated an exceptional forest ecosystem (EFE) by the Natural Resources ministry. We count up to seven precarious plant species in that area.

 

 

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